A new study of liver patients by the University of Southampton shows that a Minimum Unit Price (MUP) policy for alcohol is targeted towards the heaviest drinkers with cirrhosis.

Published today in Clinical Medicine, the peer review journal for the Royal College of Physicians, the researchers studied the amount and type of alcohol drunk by 404 liver patients, and also asked patients how much they paid for alcohol. They found that patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis were drinking on average the equivalent of four bottles of vodka each week, and were buying the cheapest booze they could find, paying around 33p per unit, irrespective of their income. In contrast low risk moderate drinkers were paying on average £1.10 per unit.

If the government set a MUP at 50p, it would not affect pubs or bars and would have no impact on moderate drinkers, according to the study. The average cost would be £4 per year and 90% would not be affected at all. The impact on heavy drinking liver patients would be at least 200 times higher. 

Alcohol is the most important single cause of early death in working age. Over the last 30 years the UK has seen a fourfold increase in liver deaths as alcohol has become less expensive and more easily available.

Reducing the affordability of alcohol is recognised internationally as the most effective and cost effective means to reduce alcohol related harm.

MUP affects the cheapest booze and the heaviest drinkers – it is the fairest and most effective way to tackle problem drinking in the UK, according to Professor Nick Sheron from the University of Southampton.

He said: “Setting a Minimum Unit Price for alcohol is an almost perfect alcohol policy because it targets cheap booze bought by very heavy drinkers and leaves moderate drinkers completely unaffected.

“Our research shows that an MUP set at 50p per unit would affect the liver patients killing themselves with cheap alcohol two hundred times more than low risk drinkers.

“Alcohol sold to heavy drinkers provides three-quarters of the profits of the UK drinks industry, of which alcohol sold to very heavy drinkers provides one third. 

When the government says it is concerned about the impact of MUP on moderate drinkers, they are simply repeating propaganda which has been put out by the drinks industry to try and preserve the huge profits they are making from people drinking at really dangerous levels.”